West Nile cases rose sharply in 2006

first_img Counties that had the highest incidence of WNND cases were mainly in the west-central United States, with 9.9 cases per 100,000 people in Idaho, 4.9 per 100,000 in South Dakota, and 3.2 per 100,000 in North Dakota, according to the CDC. In today’s issue of Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, the CDC reported a total of 4,261 cases of WNV disease in 2006, compared with 3,000 cases in 2005, for a 42% increase. The CDC looks at the number of WNND cases as the best indicator of human WNV disease trends, because health departments are more likely to report them, Mark Duffy, an Epidemic Intelligence Service officer with the CDC division of vector-borne diseases in Ft. Collins, Colo., told CIDRAP News. Compared to 2005, the number of WNND cases was up 14% in 2006. Among bird surveillance findings, the CDC said WNV infection has been identified in 300 species, including 11 in which the disease was identified for the first time in 2006. CDC. West Nile virus activity—United States, 2006. MMWR 2007 Jun 8;56(22):556-59 [Full text] One of the hot spots in 2006 was Idaho, which saw its WNND count jump from just 4 cases between 2003 and 2005 to 139 in 2006, which accounted for 9.3% of the national total, the CDC report said. Other states that had high WNND case counts were Texas, with 229, Illinois, 127, Louisiana, 91, and Mississippi, 89. WNV cases were reported in 23.3% of the nation’s counties—731 counties in 43 states—in 2006. The state of Washington reported the disease in humans for the first time. Past yearly WNV reports have shown that the incidence of WNND and death from WNND increase with age, particularly among those who are older than 60. In 2006 the median age for fatal WNND was 58, similar to previous years, the CDC said.center_img CDC’s West Nile virus sitehttp://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/westnile/index.htm Jun 7, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – The number of illnesses related to West Nile virus (WNV) in the United States rose in 2006 for the second year in a row, after a dramatic decline in 2004, suggesting that the virus will remain endemic, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). See also: Of the 2006 cases, 34.9% (1,491) were West Nile neuroinvasive disease (WNND) (meningitis, encephalitis, or acute flaccid paralysis), the CDC said. Another 61.3% (2,612) of cases were West Nile fever, and 3.7% (158) were unspecified. There were 161 deaths among the WNND cases, the report said. With the lack of an effective human WNV vaccine, prevention of the disease continues to depend on community-level mosquito control and personal protection against mosquito bites, the report says. The agency said that about 140 cases of WNV infection occur for every case of WNND and about 80% of people who are infected never have symptoms. On that basis, the CDC estimated that the nation had a total of 208,700 cases of WNV infection in 2006, including 41,750 cases of West Nile fever.last_img read more

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Myles Garrett after signing record contract: Mason Rudolph incident ‘a small bump in the road’

first_imgFor Garrett’s part, he wants to live up to the megadeal he has just penned.”Now I have to assert myself as top dog,” he said. “I feel like I’m confident and ready to do that.”Time to prove it.” Myles Garrett expects his shocking on-field clash with Mason Rudolph to “just be a small bump in the road” as he looks to play up to his reported $125 million contract extension.Garrett, the first overall pick in the 2017 NFL Draft, was handed a new five-year deal by the Cleveland Browns on Wednesday that is believed to include $100 million in guarantees — the most ever for a defensive player. Although the pass rusher has been productive in Cleveland, recording 30.5 sacks across his three seasons, his most notable act on an NFL field so far came last November in an ill-tempered rivalry game against the Pittsburgh Steelers.Garrett clashed with Rudolph, ripping the Steelers quarterback’s helmet off and swinging it at his exposed head, an act that resulted in him being suspended indefinitely, with the NFL eventually lifting his ban after the 2019 season ended.The bad blood between the two continued to linger, with Garrett claiming he reacted to Rudolph using a racial slur — something the Steelers QB denied and an NFL investigation failed to corroborate, but the Browns defensive end does not believe the moment will define his career.”My life’s much bigger than one moment,” he told reporters on a Zoom call.Don’t forget that one night @MylesLGarrett had three sacks in a game pic.twitter.com/gX57GM7Jgc— Cleveland Browns (@Browns) July 16, 2020″Me, the Browns and my teammates are going to look past that and go on to greater success and that will just be a small bump in the road. It was a reaction to a situation. It won’t happen again. Now I’m prepared.”Garrett added he had not spoken to Rudolph or Pittsburgh’s head coach Mike Tomlin, who staunchly defended his player in the wake of the Browns pass rusher’s accusation of racism.”I don’t have any ill intent towards either of them,” Garrett stressed. “I hope Mason Rudolph goes on to have success. I would talk to them. I’m going to keep my eyes moving forward.”The 2020 NFL regular season will begin in September and there will once again be high hopes for a Browns team that has talent on both sides of the ball but has yet to deliver on the field.last_img read more

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