Nominate national and local charities to share insurance company’s donations

first_img Howard Lake | 24 May 2012 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Nominate national and local charities to share insurance company’s donations  10 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: corporate Insurance company First Call Payment Protection Ltd is inviting charity supporters to nominate local and national charities to share donations from sales of its products.Somerset-based First Call Payment Protection Ltd will select the charity or charities with the most votes to receive donations.Kevin Williams, Managing Director of First Call Payment Protection Ltd, said: “We aim to link with one charity per county and several national charities. But rather than us picking the ones we would like to work with, we are hoping the general public write in and tell us who they feel would best benefit from the money and why.”When someone buys one of their products and picks the chosen charity as a beneficiary it will receive £5 from the sale.The total value of donations is not of course known at this point. A company spokesperson said: “The value of the donation depends on the number of charities supported following the nominations and voting, and of course will be closely connected to our revenue in 2013.”First Call Payment Protection Ltd offers products that are designed to help people maintain their standard of living in the event of a personal or family crisis. Products include accident sickness and unemployment insurance, income protection, and redundancy insurance.Charities can be nominated via the company’s Facebook pages and Twitter account. The closing date for nominations is midnight on 31 August 2012.Charities that are nominated and nominees will be expected to take part in publicity and individuals can only vote once for their charity of choice.www.firstcallpaymentprotection.co.uk/charities.htmlast_img read more

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Three-Decade Study Finds Young Households in a Bad Place

first_img Related Articles Radhika Ojha is an independent writer and copy-editor, and a reporter for DS News. She is a graduate of the University of Pune, India, where she received her B.A. in Commerce with a concentration in Accounting and Marketing and an M.A. in Mass Communication. Upon completion of her masters degree, Ojha worked at a national English daily publication in India (The Indian Express) where she was a staff writer in the cultural and arts features section. Ojha, also worked as Principal Correspondent at HT Media Ltd and at Honeywell as an executive in corporate communications. She and her husband currently reside in Houston, Texas. Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Tagged with: Diversity Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies Home Prices Homebuyers Homeowners Homes Households HOUSING Housing Quality Land Millennials Rent Share Save June 20, 2018 1,549 Views Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Three-Decade Study Finds Young Households in a Bad Place Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago About Author: Radhika Ojha Subscribe  Print This Post Sign up for DS News Daily center_img Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Three-Decade Study Finds Young Households in a Bad Place Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Previous: Appeals Court Addresses Foreclosures & Promissory Notes Next: How Real Estate Pros Are Embracing Mobile Devices Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, News The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago The American housing situation is better today than it was three decades ago, and yet more than 38 million U.S. households have housing cost burdens, leaving little income left to pay for food, healthcare, and other basic necessities.That’s the assessment of Harvard University’s Joint Center for Housing Studies (JCHS) in its annual State of the Nation’s Housing report. Since 1988, when the report debuted, about 40 million homes have been built to accommodate 27 million new households. Houses have become larger, better built, and generally safer to live in, structurally, JCHS reported.But fewer young adults, millennials, in this case, can afford homes today than 30 years ago. That, the report states, is despite the fact that high housing costs in the 1980s kept buyers away in droves.“With fewer young adults buying homes, demand for rental housing remained high—as did rents despite a boom in multifamily construction,” the report states. “Rapid losses of low-cost rentals forced millions more lower-income households to spend outsized shares of their incomes on housing.”In other words, 38 million households, in the U.S. in 2018, mainly renters, are considered burdened, meaning the residents spend more than 30 percent of their income on household expenses like rent.“Despite their growing numbers, only about one in four very low-income renters benefited from subsidies to close the gap between market rents and what they could afford to pay,” the report states. As it is, federal housing assistance reaches only a fraction of the large and growing number of low-income households in need.”The report goes on to say that between the shortage of subsidized housing and the ongoing losses of low-cost rentals through market forces, low-income households have increasingly few housing options. Meanwhile, the rising incidence and intensity of natural disasters pose new threats to the housing stocks of entire communities.“Soaring housing costs are largely to blame, with the national median rent rising 20 percent faster than overall inflation in 1990–2016 and the median home price 41 percent faster,” JCHS reported. And although better housing quality accounts for some of this increase, the report stated, “sharply higher” costs for building materials and labor, along with limited productivity gains in the homebuilding industry have made housing construction considerably more expensive. “Land prices have also skyrocketed as population growth in metro areas has intensified demand for well-located sites,” the report stated. Add to that the rise of new regulatory barriers that limit the supply of land available for homes and the growing complexity of planning and building housing communities, and the strain on the lowest earning young adults, JCHS wrote, is overwhelming.And it doesn’t look like it’s going to get much easier. As the expense and complexity of housing has increased, earnings have not necessarily kept pace. Gross domestic product per capita increased  52 percent in between 1988 and 2017, the report stated. And “if incomes had kept pace more broadly with the economy’s growth over the past 30 years, they would have easily matched the rise in housing costs.” This, JCHS concluded, underscores how income inequality “has helped to fuel today’s housing  affordability challenges.”The study garnered an immediate reaction from housing insiders. Danielle Hale, Chief Economist for realtor.com, said the racial gaps present in the housing system are a top priority to address.“If we can’t address racial and ethnic gaps in the homeownership rate, it may hold back the homeownership rate for the diverse millennial generation,” she said. “The gains made by Asian Americans and Hispanics are important because they make up 27 percent of the 18-34 population.”At the same time, Hale said the losses in homeownership rate among the African-Americans population “will have a bigger impact on overall numbers as their share of the population grows.” African-Americans currently make up 14 percent of 18- to 34-year-olds, and 10 percent of adults age 55 plus. Diversity Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies Home Prices Homebuyers Homeowners Homes Households HOUSING Housing Quality Land Millennials Rent 2018-06-20 Radhika Ojha The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days agolast_img read more

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Simple beauties of math (yes, math)

first_imgShing-Tung Yau sees a beautiful universe around him, crafted by nature into the shapes and forms we see every day. Mathematics describes those shapes and forms, the discipline of geometry in particular. So, to Yau, it shares nature’s beauty.Yau, the Graustein Professor of Mathematics and chair of the Math Department, is trying to bring math out of the closet. Its practitioners, he said, are not strange or reclusive, as the public sometimes perceives them, but rather scientists trying to understand the orderly principles that describe the world around us.Isaac Newton, for example, made major contributions to calculus in order to describe the motions of the planets. Mathematicians draw insights from their work with numbers, shapes, and forms that can help other scientists, especially physicists, in their work.“I think people don’t understand that we are scientists and make fundamental contributions,” Yau said. “We can help physicists; we can help engineers.”Yau’s own work is an important example of such fruitful collaboration. In 1976, Yau proved the Calabi conjecture, which dealt with the properties of multidimensional shapes called manifolds. Yau’s work proved important to physicists who use string theory to describe the universe. String theory says that the basic particles that we understand to constitute matter are themselves made of tiny vibrating strings.One of string theory’s difficulties is that it requires a universe made of 10 dimensions. That would mean the four dimensions of space-time that we live in — length, width, height, and duration in time — are only part of the puzzle. It turns out that a six-dimensional Calabi-Yau manifold resulting from Yau’s work fits string theory nicely, providing a shape for these six dimensions. So critical is the geometry of the manifolds to the universe that their shapes determine the basic forces and particles of matter.“In principle, you can use the geometry of space-time to describe the fundamental structure of particles,” Yau said. “We have been able to get a lot of important ideas when it comes to string theory. It’s been a very fruitful collaboration.”Yau teamed up with science writer Steve Nadis to tell the story of the discovery of Calabi-Yau manifolds in a book that came out in September. “The Shape of Inner Space: String Theory and the Geometry of the Universe’s Hidden Dimensions” details his work proving the Calabi conjecture, which he actually first labored to disprove, realizing only in his failure that the conjecture was probably right after all. The book goes on to discuss string theory and the developments that stem from his proof.“I couldn’t produce an answer [that proved the Calabi conjecture wrong], so eventually I had to believe the opposite is true,” Yau said.Yau jokes in the book’s preface that the phrase “Calabi-Yau” has been used so often in recent years that he almost feels that “Calabi” is his first name, which he says he’d be proud to have. Yau also said that his study of mathematics has been an adventure and that the math theories underlying models of the universe hold an undeniable beauty. Yau’s work has earned him numerous prestigious awards, including the Fields Medal, the National Medal of Science, and a MacArthur Foundation fellowship, known as the “genius grant.”Yau said he hopes the book helps the public to understand better the importance of mathematics and to develop a sense of how it works. For mathematicians who read the book, he hopes they understand the importance of reaching across the boundaries of various disciplines.Looking ahead, Yau said the new frontiers of mathematics will involve “quantum geometry,” which explains both quantum mechanics and general relativity.“Quantum geometry — nobody knows what it is. Nobody has a clue. That’s why it’s exciting,” Yau said. “It’s too difficult a subject for one person or one discipline to work on.”last_img read more

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